WARRIORS Playoffs: Pelicans coach complains about the crowd noise at ‘Roaracle’

The Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry (30) celebrates a basket and being fouled against the New Orleans Pelican in the second quarter of Game 1 of the first round of the NBA Western Conference playoffs at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Saturday, April 18, 2015. (Dan Honda/Bay Area News Group)
The Golden State Warriors’ Stephen Curry (30) celebrates a basket at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Saturday, April 18, 2015. (Dan Honda/Bay Area News Group)

SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — The delirium inside Golden State Warriors’ “Roaracle” arena may be illegal thanks in large part to the 19,500 screaming fans dressed in gold shirts, according to New Orleans Pelicans coach Monty Williams.

“I’m not so sure that the decibel level is legal there, and I’m serious,” Williams said before Game 2 of their first-round playoff series Monday. “They’ve done studies on that. Being on the competition committee, there’s got to be something to that because it does get a little out of hand.

Williams’ made the comments before his team’s morning shootaround at the University of San Francisco, and days since losing 106-99 on Saturday.

“I’ve talked about it for years, they’ve got some of the best fans in the league here, and they show up early,” he continued. “The music before the game, they’re playing old school music, and it’s right above your locker room. And you’re like, ‘These people are crazy, man. This is pretty cool.’ So I’m sure it has an effect, but after a few minutes it’s just basketball.”

Oracle Arena, one of the NBA’s loudest arenas, is preparing to host Game 2 on Monday night where the Dubs have won 19 straight and 40 of 42 games this season.

“So much going on, it was so loud I couldn’t hear my teammates, my coaches,” Pelicans power forward Anthony Davis said after Sunday’s practice.

And it won’t be any easier for the Pelican’s to call plays from the bench or inside a huddle — Warriors’ Klay Thompson and forward Andre Iguodala said it’s typically louder for night games.

“It’s something you got to get used to,” Thompson said. “We all got to adjust, and that’s not just them. That’s why we have the best homecourt in the NBA is because our fans are great and they show up every night.”

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