San Jose adult care home company cited nearly $450K for wage theft

SAN JOSE (BCN) — A company that manages five adult care homes in San Jose was cited nearly $450,000 for wage theft violations against nearly two dozen workers, California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement officials said Monday.

TJ Homes Corporation was cited $443,460 after investigators found the company didn’t compensate their employees with minimum wage or overtime hours, according to the DLSE, also known as the labor commissioner’s office.

The company runs facilities in South San Jose, each known as Evergreen Guest Home on Haga Drive, Bendmill Way and two on McLaughlin Avenue, in addition to one called Lindstrom Arf on Lindstrom Court, labor commissioner’s officials said.

The operator was ordered to pay 22 caregivers with $192,050 in lost wages, $150,200 in liquidated damages and $26,855 in interest and waiting time penalties, according to the labor commissioner’s office. The company also owes $74,355 in civil penalties that will be paid to the state’s general fund.

“These caregivers, who were cheated of their wages by their employer, will now be paid their lost wages,” state Labor Commissioner Julie Su said in a statement.

“TJ Homes Corporation also will pay liquidated damages and civil penalties for shortchanging their workers on minimum wage and overtime, making it clear that violating wage and hour laws is much more expensive than paying employees what they are owed,” Su said.

The investigation into TJ Homes started in response to a complaint received last April by the Labor Commissioner’s Office.

The company’s records showed workers logged up to 12 hours a day but didn’t receive overtime pay, were required to work night shifts without compensation and were paid less than San Jose’s $10.30 minimum wage,
according to the labor commissioner’s office.

Employee pay stubs didn’t indicate their hourly pay rate or amount of regular and overtime hours they worked. Any workers who resigned or were fired didn’t receive their final pay required by law, according to the labor commissioner’s office.

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