Videos: KRON4’s coverage of the Oroville Dam crisis

Water continues to run down the main spillway at Lake Oroville on Monday, Feb. 12, 2017, in Oroville, Calif. The water level dropped Monday behind the nation's tallest dam, reducing the risk of a catastrophic spillway collapse and easing fears that prompted the evacuation of nearly 200,000 people downstream. Sunday afternoon's evacuation order came after engineers spotted a hole on the concrete lip of the secondary spillway for the 770-foot-tall Oroville Dam and told authorities that it could fail within the hour. (Randy Pench/The Sacramento Bee via AP)
Water continues to run down the main spillway at Lake Oroville on Monday, Feb. 12, 2017, in Oroville, Calif. The water level dropped Monday behind the nation's tallest dam, reducing the risk of a catastrophic spillway collapse and easing fears that prompted the evacuation of nearly 200,000 people downstream. Sunday afternoon's evacuation order came after engineers spotted a hole on the concrete lip of the secondary spillway for the 770-foot-tall Oroville Dam and told authorities that it could fail within the hour. (Randy Pench/The Sacramento Bee via AP)

(KRON) All of KRON4’s coverage of the Oroville Dam crisis are in one place.

State officials are waiting for the light of dawn to inspect an erosion scar on the potentially hazardous emergency spillway at northern California’s Oroville Dam.

California Department of Water Resources Action Director Bill Croyle says officials in helicopters overflew the spillway Sunday night to visually inspect it.

Evacuations for at least 188,000 people living below the dam were ordered Sunday after officials warned the emergency spillway was in danger of failing and unleashing uncontrolled flood waters on towns below.

Water levels at the huge dam are continuing to drop and stopping water from spilling over the emergency spillway.

California Department of Water Resources officials say flows into the lake are just under 45,000 cubic feet per second. Outflows remain high at nearly 100,000 cubic feet per second.

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