Autopsy: Las Vegas gunman had anti-anxiety drugs in system but wasn’t under the influence of them

FILE - This undated photo provided by Eric Paddock shows his brother, Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock. On Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest festival killing dozens and wounding hundreds. Paddock left behind little clues about what led him to carry out the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. He killed 58 and wounded nearly 500 before killing himself. Paddock's brain is being sent to Stanford University for a months-long examination after a visual inspection during an autopsy found "no abnormalities," Las Vegas authorities said. Doctors will perform multiple forensic analyses, including an exam of the 64-year-old's brain tissue to find any neurological problems. (Courtesy of Eric Paddock via AP, File)

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Latest on autopsy results released after the Las Vegas massacre (all times local):

4:45 p.m.

An autopsy found Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock had anti-anxiety drugs in his system but was not under the influence of them and was otherwise healthy.

The autopsy was released Friday in response to a lawsuit brought by The Associated Press and the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

It showed signs of benzodiazepines in Paddock’s system but said because the substances were found in his urine and not his blood, Paddock wasn’t under the influence of the medication. The report said he was overweight but otherwise healthy.

Paddock killed 58 people and injured more than 800 others when he unleashed a hail of bullets onto a musical venue below from his high-rise suite at the Mandalay Bay casino-hotel on Oct. 1.

Paddock fatally shot himself before officers stormed his hotel suite.

____

2:15 p.m.

A Las Vegas judge has ordered The Associated Press and Las Vegas Review-Journal to return copies of a redacted autopsy of an off-duty police officer killed in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

The judge’s ruling on Friday also barred the media organizations from further reporting the details of Officer Charleston Hartfield’s autopsy.

AP attorney Brian Barrett said the news cooperative would immediately appeal the ruling.

The autopsy record was one of 58 that another judge ordered the Clark County coroner’s office to release last week to the AP and Review-Journal.

The officer’s widow, Veronica Hartfield, argued the autopsy records were confidential and contained protected health information.

Attorneys representing the news organizations said once personal identifiers are redacted, claims to privacy no longer apply.

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